“What a terrible mess. Kevin, what have you been doing?”

Cataloguing Kevin Saves the World

We are continuously working behind the scenes and making additions to the UCA Archives and Special Collections catalogue. The catalogue was recently updated online to include the newly catalogued series Kevin Saves the World, a children’s animated series based on a book of the same name by author Daniel Postgate. One of the larger series of the Bob Godfrey Archive, Kevin Saves the World comprises some 38 boxes of animation material, including correspondence, pencil drawings, acetate cels, dope sheets, sound recordings, scripts, and storyboards to name a few!

Material from Kevin and the Genie

Material from Kevin and the Genie

An initial delve into the boxes suggested that there were five animated shorts that formed the series: Kevin Saves the World, Kevin and the Computer Game, Kevin and the Big Lizard, Kevin and the Genie, and Kevin and the Bogeyman. There was pre-production and production material for these episodes. The scripts and storyboards provided information on the content of each episode, and some title scenes revealed the credits of the animations. Interestingly, the titles were in both English and Norwegian. These revealed that the series was produced by Bob Godfrey Films and Kine Aune and supported by the Norwegian Film Institute and the Nordisk Film & T.V. Fund.

Progress was being made. The key individuals and organisations behind the series and the synopsis of each episode were now known. However, there was still little contextual information about the series. When the last couple of boxes of material were sorted through, things got a little more complicated. There was evidence of other episodes previously unknown about – Kevin’s Christmas Treat, Kevin and the Recipe Book, and Kevin and the Ghosts. Not long after this discovery, an entire box full of correspondence and scripts was discovered. Sifting through this material created a more complete picture of the production of the series.

Just a small selection from the Kevin Saves the World scripts

Just a small selection from the Kevin Saves the World scripts

In total 14 episodes were found to have pre-production material (scripts and storyboards). There was partial production material for 2 of the episodes, and full production material for 5 of the episodes. The correspondence records revealed that a longer series of around 12-13 episodes was originally planned. However, it proved difficult to find broadcasters who were willing to broadcast animated shorts of only 5 minutes. The series also faced funding difficulties, which explains the halt in production and the presence of only pre-production material for a majority of the episodes. The first five episodes were broadcast in Norway, where some of the available funding had been sourced.

Using the information gathered, the series catalogue structure fell into place. A ‘series’ record was created for Kevin Saves the World. Each individual episode was then arranged underneath this with its own ‘sub-series’ record. Under these records, the material was arranged into pre-production and production material, where it existed. Correspondence had its own ‘sub-series’ record, as the material covered the contents of multiple episodes and was relevant to the series as a whole. Correspondence was then arranged into different ‘files’ according to their original order. Find out more about the structure of the catalogue by viewing this presentation.

Kevin Saves the World Catalogue Screenshot

Kevin Saves the World Catalogue Screenshot

After arranging a structure, further contextual information is added to the records in the form of authority files. Relevant names of people and organisations involved with the series are created in the authorities database and linked to the records, so that names may be cross-searched by users. Subject terms are also applied to identify key themes and subjects within the material.

Kevin Saves the World Authority Names Screenshot

Kevin Saves the World Authority Names Screenshot

The Kevin Saves the World series is now available to view on the UCA Archives and Special Collections Online Catalogue.

Kevin Saves the World images copyright Bob Godfrey and Daniel Postgate. All images are for educational purposes only.

Hannah Ratford, Archive Cataloguer

Latest catalogue entries for the Bob Godfrey collection

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You can see the latest catalogue entries for the Bob Godfrey collection here

Highlights include preliminary entries for his oscar winning film Great and popular children’s animation Henry’s Cat.  A diverse range of other subjects are covered such as misogyny and sexual humour in Biowoman and Dream Doll, envionmental issues in Dirty Rat Tales and gentle humour Alan Bennett style in And So To Bed (see my blog post about And So To Bed here).

The catalogue includes a useful glossary of animation terms. Keep a look out for further updates in the future as the catalogue grows!

Online Archives Catalogue

UCA’s online Archives Catalogue is now available here http://bit.ly/1aT5xAw

Search across unique material looking at the design processes within the arts, themes within the arts, including gender stereotyping, poltics and propaganda, and the social history of art.

Collections include the six former Art Schools and, further mergers, the institutional archives of UCA, the Tessa Boffin Archive, LGBT Photographer, and David Birch, landscape painter, illustration work. Work is also commencing on cataloguing the Bob Godfrey Archive, Britain’s first oscar winning animator, and the Diagram Group, Graphic Designers, working since the 1960s

online catalogue

West Surrey College of Art and Design Catalogue Online

Records from the West Surrey College of Art and Design can now be accessed online at http://community.ucreative.ac.uk/article/38029/West-Surrey-College-of-Art-and-Design

Records consist of Prospectuses, Student Societies, Departmental and School records, including Audio Visual Studies, Three Dimensional Design, Textiles. Fine Art. Design and Foundation Studies, Library minutes, Institutional reviews and reports for Council for National Academic Awards and Governors, Publications and newsletters,Henry Hammond, head of the department of Three Dimmensional Design, retirement photographs

West Surrey College of Art and Design consists of Farnham and Guildford Schools of Art. At the end of 1968 the first moves to merge the two art schools at Farnham and Guildford were underway. Guildford had undergone recent student unrest, and now in the first stages of merger, the fine art students were due to transfer from Guildford to Farnham, and the graphic design students from Farnham to Guildford. However the accommodation vacated by the graphic design students was unsuitable for fine art students, and alternative accommodation was suggested at Hatch Mill, formerly the Farnham Sanitary Laundry for 120 foundation students. However this plan was initially obstructed by the highways committee who considered the location over the other side of the bypass too dangerous for students to negotiate. There were other issues over council concerns over student attitudes (seemingly inflamed by the Guildford unrest).

Foundation students were currently housed in leased accommodation at Wrecclesham Hall. However this space was no longer available, and a second attempt was made under the leadership of Sir John Verney, one of the governors, and despite continuing opposition, a compromise was achieved, and the students were to be allowed the use of Hatch Mill for a period of nine years with a new footpath provided by the council.

In April 1969 200 students moved into the initial phase of the newly constructed building in The Hart. The building had cost £250,000 and was the work of county architect Raymond Ash.

In September 1969 Farnham School of Art formally merged with the Guildford School of Art to form the West Surrey College of Art and Design. The second phase of building commenced.

In the 1970s numbers 23 and 24 West Street were used for student accommodation, after the death of Jessie Goddard, the owner and widow of the local builder, John Goddard.

Ben Franklin was head of sculpture from 1970 to 1981. During that period he sculpted the bronze, entitled Matriarch, and this was erected in Borelli Yard.

James Hockey retired in 1971, having had an extension granted by Surrey County Council in order to ease the integration of the two schools. He had been a seminal figure for nearly 30 post war years and was succeeded by Thomas Arnold who remained as Principal until 1974.

In 1971/1972 a new course in animation was introduced. It was set up by the British Oscar-winning animator, Bob Godfrey (1921 -2013 ).

Leonard Stoppani was Principal from 1974 until 1984. He carefully steered the College into a new era, exercising initiative, restraint to allow the development of new patterns.

Design courses were still concentrated at Guildford, and foundation, fine art and craft courses at Farnham. However by 1976 the long-established courses in photography and graphic design, together with the more recently constructed film & television production, animation and television graphics were brought together under the Audio Visual Studies department under the leadership of Peter Sanger. The remaining courses finally moved from Guildford to Farnham and by 1977 all students and staff from Guildford had moved into the new building. Degree intakes started in 1980.

In 1978 the difficult decision was made to phase out all vocational design courses (Graphic Design, Product Design, Interior Design and Surface Design). They were considered more appropriate to the facilities of a polytechnic.

In 1978/1979 Harold Cheesman, Head of Fine Art retired, and was succeeded by the renowned “Polish Scottish colourist”, Leszek Muszynski, who had taught at Farnham since 1951.

During his time Art History was on the curriculum, and it was the difficulties in accessing the William Morris collection at Kelmscott Manor, that inspired Joseph Acheson, the Senior Lecturer in Art History, to mount an exhibition on William Morris that was held at Farnham in November 1981.

By 1982 there were nearly 640 full-time students attending the college. The Foundation course accepted 120 students a year, and remained in the old grammar school in West Street. The degree courses were organised into four departments: Fine Art (Painting with 20 students, Sculpture with 12 students and Printmaking with 12 students); Audio-Visual Studies (Photography with 25 students, Film & Video with 12 students and Animation with 12 students); Three Dimensional Design (Ceramics, Glass & Metals introduced in September 1981) and Textiles (Woven Textiles, Printed Textiles). Art History and Complementary Studies were an integral part of all the courses.

Michael Fairclough, lecturer, executed an abstract mural reflecting the town’s geographical location. It covers a blank wall of the newly opened Post Office at 107 West Street.

The second stage of the college development was completed in 1977, although the foundation course continued there into the 1990s when it too transferred to Falkner Road.

John Morris became Principal in 1984, remaining until 1986. Gary Crossley became Acting Director, until the arrival of Norman Taylor in 1986.

In 1995 the West Surrey College of Art and Design merged with the Epsom & Ewell School of Art to form the Surrey Institute of Art and Design.

Guildford Prospectus 1956-7

Medway College of Design Catalogue Online

The Medway College of Design Catalogue is accessible here at http://community.ucreative.ac.uk/article/38034/Medway-College-of-Design

The Medway College of Design was one of the predecessors to the Kent Institute of Art and Design, and now is Rochester Campus of the University for the Creative Arts. The institute dates from 1853, and dealt with courses regarding design, including art, and fashion, fashion and design being one of Rochester’s specialities today.

The archive dates from 1928 and contains

  • Student fashion shows
  • Press cuttings
  • Student art sketch books from1951-1962
  • Student fashion exam book, 1966, with examples of cotton, wool and silk

Uses can be seen in the subject guides, including Medway local historyart and design, fashion and local architecture

Guildford School of Art and Epsom and Ewell Technical Institute Catalogues Online

The Guildford School of Art Archive and the Epsom and Ewell Technical Institute and School of Art Archive have been catalogued and available on http://community.ucreative.ac.uk/article/38026/Guildford-School-of-Art and http://community.ucreative.ac.uk/article/38025/Epsom-Technical-Institute-and-School-of-Art

The Guildford School of Art catalogue contains material regarding the student protest over the quality of art teaching, prospectuses relating to book binding, printing and photography, and press cuttings

Further uses can be seen in the Subject Guide Student Activity and Protest on http://community.ucreative.ac.uk/article/37662/Student-Activity-and-Protests

Guildford School of Art Printing Prospectus 1957-8

The Epsom and Ewell Technical Institute and School of Art catalogue  contains foundation correspondence, finance, and building plans for the formation of the institute, Governors’ Minutes, and academic minutes, visitors’ books, and prospectuses.

Uses can be seen in the subject guides including History of the University http://community.ucreative.ac.uk/article/37664/History-of-the-University-for-the-Creative-Arts, Women in Education (prospectuses) http://community.ucreative.ac.uk/article/37661/Women-in-Education and War Time Education http://community.ucreative.ac.uk/article/37659/War-Time-Education , among others

Contact Rebekah Taylor on rtaylor8@ucreative.ac.uk for further information

Canterbury College archive online

Canterbury College archive has been catalogued and can now be found online on http://archiveshub.ac.uk/data/gb3094ccol

Canterbury College was originally formed as the Sidney Cooper School of Art in 1868, and has continued through mergers with Rochester and Maidstone to become Kent Institute of Art and Design, and finally the University for the Creative Arts with further mergers with Epsom and Farnham campuses.

A 1905 visitors’ book from Canterbury, showing names of visitors to exhibitions,

This can potentially provide information regarding family and local history

The collection includes

  • Departmental prospectuses
  • Student work, including degree and diploma shows
  • Research projects
  • Student magazines
  • Minutes from the Art department
  • General college information, including general prospectuses, and financial information
  • Visitor book
  • Library information
  • Staff interviews and lectures
  • Board of Education reports
  • General exhibitions at or associated with Canterbury College
  • Staff photographs

What can the collection tell us?

Canterbury College can provide information regarding architecture and art, graphic design, fashion, art and painting, including sculpture work. Pictures of student work, fashion videos from the 1980s, research projects, and staff interviews and lectures can show various trends and popularity in these subjects. They could also potentially provide inspiration for future work

Course development in the creative arts, development with technology, and the history of the university generally can be seen in prospectuses, education reports, financial information, and library information and minutes from the school of art

Family history and local history can be explored through visitors books, press cuttings, exhibition shows, and student magazines and staff and student photographs

Student activity can be seen through student magazines

Topical thoughts and opinions on the day in the 1980s can be seen through magazines, including thoughts on the falklands, and sexual morality

Tessa Boffin archive catalogue online

The archive of Tessa Boffin, photographer who worked in the 1980s, has now been catalogued.  She specialised in sex, sexual fantasy,Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender issues, and looked at the portayal of AIDS, including AIDS in the media. Her archive also sheds light into the technical side of photography

It can be accessed online on Archives Hub at http://archiveshub.ac.uk/data/gb3094boff.

Of note include her technical books on photography, her project books where Boffin analyses the media on topics such as AIDS, feminism, homosexuality, cross-dressing, for inspiration for photography ideas, her project work on ‘The Slings and Arrows of Outrageous Fortune: AIDS and the Body Politic’, and her project ‘The Sailor and the Showgirl’, which explores cross-dressing, gender, and safe sex.

The biographical information of her life is as follows:

Tessa Boffin was born 24 December 1960. She was a lesbian photographer, writer, editor, and performance artist. Her work was at the front-line of international queer culture and politics. She initially studied photography in the mid 1980s at the Polytechnic of Central London, under the tutorship of Simon Watney. She undertook an MA in Critical Theory at the University of Sussex in 1987-1988.

Her teaching was as a part time photography lecturer at Adult Education, London from 1986 to 1987, worked at Oxford Polytechnic,1987 and 1989, worked at West Surrey College of Art and Design from 1988, Polytechnic of Central London, 1990, Kent institute of Art and Design from 1990.

She edited Ecstatic Antibodies in 1990 with Sunil Gupta, and co-curated the exhibition, which contributed to understanding of the role images played in the AIDS crisis, and in 1991 edited Stolen Glances: Lesbians Take Photographs, with Jean Fraser, which is contemporary lesbian photography. She was the first British lesbian doing political work around AIDS as early as 1985.

She died on 27th October 1993, while working as a lecturer at the Kent Institute for Art and Design

Tessa Boffin was a remarkable woman, and her archive sheds an evocative light of the portrayal of LGBT issues in the 1980s.

Rebekah Taylor, Archivist & Special Collections Officer