Artwork from Canterbury archives

Below is the blog post by Faith Cannon, volunteer, who has been working with archives

Faith Cannon
B .A. Honours Fine Art, UCA Canterbury
Artist in-residence for the Archives
Since using the archives as a resource it has greatly opened my eyes to possibilities that are at our fingertips. As we develop as artisans we need to experiment and find the areas which fulfil us personally. So research is always needed within your chosen field. The archives can aid that research but we often look at the famous artisans rather than the more obscure. Perhaps that’s because we want to please others during our studies rather than ourselves. I have found that there are so many less well known people that show great understanding in their chosen field. So please take a look!
During this year I have photographed many of the archival boxes which I hope will be online for you to see. After doing this I decided to collaborate with others from my cohort to map out ways to promote the use of the archives, we came up with some great ideas and hope to develop these further within UCA.
I decided to make artwork from one of the resources in the archive. I chose a 1990 catalogue from a sculpture exhibition. I followed my own practice of connection to see if there would be artists I knew who had shown work in this exhibition and yes there were.

Canterbury

These are but a few of the artists which exhibited at Canterbury. The archives show you the process that they went through to bring this exhibition together. I asked one of the artists what they remembered of this exhibition and he said “it was a large exhibition which was aided by many institutions around Canterbury and he suggested that perhaps we should do this again as an exhibition for the future!”
This drew me to focus on sculpture and how the 2D form of drawing is the beginning of ideas and develops into the 3D sculpture. I experimented with processes and materials from sketching, painting, carving, weaving to manipulating digital images. I found that this fed my experiential learning which drives my practice.
This display I hope evokes the possibilities of using the archives! So have a go!!
faithcannon@aol.com for further information or Rebekah Taylor, Archivist or the Librarians.

Advertisements

Re-shaping the Art School archive

Alumni Faith Cannon, Fine Art, has been working with the Canterbury archives to look at how it can be used in art today

Images from a sculpture show at Canterbury, 1989-1990

Images from a Sculpture Show at Canterbury, 1989-90

On starting this project using the UCA archive, it has made me aware of the potential collaboration with other Alumni artists from the past, and the possibilities for students today to use resources which are at their fingertips. Sometimes when you’re on a course you get so tied up with producing work and researching you forget that others have done this before – not just the famous artist, photographer, architect- but previous students. They can be an untapped resource to the artists block, a curatorial presentation or that planning for that ever looming Degree Show!

I thought I would give you a little taster of some the items I have photographed and how I have made new work from those early images. There are possibilities for others to get involved with our collaboration to heighten the use of the archival material.

New collage of past images

New collage of past images

Images from a Degree Show Into the Unknown 2007. New collage of past images from the archive.

Images from a Degree Show Into the Unknown 2007. New collage of past images from the archive.

This Catalogue was of a really high standard and would be of interest to the 3rd year students who may be planning their own shows this year. Please take a look as it is your moment to have some super images of your work.

Canterbury archive

The archives have such a creative depth of ideas to aid your own practice and development. I decided to invite others to get involved to see how they would use the past material. We asked the question ‘How could we promote the use of the archives?’ We used a mind map to channel ideas.

 

Mind map 3Mind map 4Mind map 2Mind map 1

 

This drew many interesting possibilities. One artist wanted to do a poster to promote the archives, another sketched the shapes into a design, others photographed details and images that fitted with their own practice. I decided to research one catalogue to see how long it would be until I found a person I knew, as this followed my own practice of continuum and connections. I researched some of the artists to see if after 25 years how their practice had changed. This drew me to look at the materials, processes and how they had evolved. I decided to sketch some of the images to see how the 3D sculpture would have been seen in a 2D form. Those initial ideas that artist create from pen on paper.

This collaboration between the past/present drew me to experiment with the images to see how I could manipulate them to create something new, and the research aspect fuelled the connections element of my practice – and there amongst the archives I found someone I knew!

 

Created by Faith Cannon and other contributors

Jo Robinson

Colin Pratt

Many Quy-verlander

 

 

AIDS in Image: World AIDS Day

For Worlds AIDS Day on the 1st December, we are shedding a light on our resources in Archives and Special Collections, and how material on AIDS or the body and disease, can be used in your creative practice. You can find our archive catalogue on our website, and you can search for keywords such as AIDS or disease.

Tessa Boffin, undertook photography work around AIDS, in the 1980/90s, a terrifying time when the stigma of AIDS was just emerging, and the persecution of the LGBT communities in this regard was most notable, with backlash from the media. The adverts around AIDS at the time, including this advert highlight the terror around this.

Tessa Boffin co-curated an exhibition, Ecstatic Antibodies, with Sunil Gupta in 1990 which played an understanding in how image contributed to the AIDS crisis; the finished book  is available on our library catalogue

Ecstatic_Bodies

 

Her archive  shows the whole artistic journey related to her work with AIDS. of her original notes shows exactly where she got her inspiration from, relating to the persecution of LGBT communities via the media. Her carefully articulated notes document different media forms and how they portray LGBT communities, and AIDS, such as radio and television, with the name and date of the programme. After providing a summary of the media, she analyses the material to see how it can be used in her own artistic practice.

Coursework regarding her AIDS work

Coursework regarding her AIDS work

 

Her study notes also use religious imagery, including images of Martyrs, and her work Slings and Arrows of Outrageous Fortune: AIDS and the Body Politic, also references Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

Her archive also includes reviews on Ecstatic antibodies.

We also have the archives from our previous 6 art schools, which includes student magazines, which highlight attitudes to LGBT issues, and safe sex, with one magazine with the front cover on AIDS.

So how can material on AIDS in the 1980s be used for Creative Practice today? Well one of the areas is theoretically to look at the social commentary related to this practice :-

how does the media’s voice differ from the 80s -90s? Does it? What do differing newspapers say? Why do they have that perspective?

What are the attitudes to safe sex then and now?

Is image and disease still a key area in Creative Arts? Why do you think that image and Disease works?

Look through the images related to AIDS in our archive.  What significance regarding the colour? Why are there allusions to Shakespeare?

The topic of persecution

Practice based creative work has also be created in relation to AIDS work. Recently first year Fashion Promotion students created responses to Tessa Boffin’s archive, in an exhibition entitled Stolen Glances, after a book by Tessa Boffin and Jean Fraser.  This was done as a homage to her, looking at her technique.

Another way of looking at this, is ‘then and now’- would these 1980s/90s images fit in today’s setting? How would you interpret them?

To find more about our AIDS archives, you can access our catalogue on our website, and search for ‘AIDS’. Alternatively you can email us at archives@ucreative.ac.uk for 1-1 tutorials. We can also advise on other AIDS collections and archives.

For further inspiration take a look at library books in our library catalogue on AIDS

 

Learning and Teaching Resources Released

Learning and research resources from the Archives and Special Collections have been released here https://www.flickr.com/photos/119688205@N06/sets/.

So far these cover: feminism and women studies, politics, race, animals and art, LGBT, war and art, disability, 20th century art education, and art education protest.

We have subject specific sets including Animation, Photography, Graphic Design, Fashion, Architecture and Crafts, and images are also grouped in their specific archive or special collection, or by campus.

 

Learning and teaching resources screenshot

 

You can access our learning and teaching resources through our website http://community.ucreative.ac.uk/archives

Print screen from website

This is a work in progress, so any feedback or requests for subject themes  would be much appreciated. Contact us at archives@ucreative.ac.uk.

Please note due to the copyright complications in art collections, it is not possible to put on all images online, but all effort is being made to trace copyright holders.

 

 

 

Artists and Archives

This post explores some ways that UCA Fine Art students and staff have used archives within Fine Art projects

Five BA Hons Fine Art Artists from UCA are currently putting on their debut exhibition in UCA Maidstone Campus, which involves using images from the Maidstone College of Art archive. This project will also explore sound art in the form of oral history, of the Maidstone College of Art alumnis. The exhibition will provisionallyt take place on the 18th-22nd March 2013. For news of their progress follow their blog here http://fiveartfuse.wordpress.com/

Maidstone prospectus

Lucy Harrison, Fine Art lecturer at Canterbury UCA, has also undertaken work into archives and libraries. This includes a A partial and ongoing collection of east London clubs and societies, commissioned by the London Legacy Development Corporation to anticpate the opening of a new North Park community hub in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in the summer of 2013. This can be accessed here http://aclubcollection.tumblr.com/

This also includes the Library Archway project. This was a residency at Archway Library, London, between September 2012 and January 2013, part of Hostings / A Million Minutes. Two newspapers and an audio tour of the library, read by a member of library staff, were launched at the end of the project and are available in the library.
http://www.lucy-harrison.co.uk/projects/archway-library

Louisa Love, a Fine Art third year student at UCA Canterbury, has also curated a display with digital prints from the Tessa Boffin archive

Examples from other institutions include the Kingston School of Art oral history project accessible http://www.kingston.ac.uk/alumni/news-and-events/alumni-stories/2012/august/23-ksa-project/